Guns on Planes

I am wondering what you think about allowing citizens to take weapons (such as guns) on public flights? The problem with weapon laws, in my understanding, is that those who obey the laws do not need the laws in the first place and those that break laws are going to break them anyway. In other words, if a terrorist really wants to find a way to get a gun on a plane and then tries to use it, all the law abiding citizens are at the mercy of the terrorist. If law abiding citizens are allowed to exercise their right to bear arms, ANY WHERE (including planes, hospitals, churches, etc), I would think that terrorists and other law breakers would be much more hesitant to attack, for fear of not just law enforcement officers but also average citizens.

On the topic of “what happens if someone shoots a gun on a plane, even accidentally”, Mythbusters had a great episode on that actually. They pressurized a plane and shot holes through it. Nothing catastrophic. The myth was totally busted. They had to attach a major explosive to the side of the plane to actually affect some catastrophic damage.

What are your thoughts about guns on planes?

Tax the Rich

Just doing a little math here. A true “flat tax” might look something like this:
US Population 2010: 309 million people (309000000)
US Federal budget request for 2010: $3.55 trillion ($3550000000000)

3550000000000 / 309000000 = $11,488.67/person/year

That is quite a bit of tax. Although, consider what we pay in taxes across the board in sales, property, gas, income, SS, etc, etc.

I just read some articles that I found interesting.

Tax the Rich!

“1. Poor Americans do pay taxes… including federal payroll taxes. Between gas taxes, sales taxes, utility taxes and other taxes, no one lives tax free in America.”

“[D]uring seven of the eight Bush years, the IRS report on the top 400 taxpayers was labeled a state secret, a policy that the Obama administration overturned almost immediately after his inauguration.”

“Since 1980, when President Reagan won election promising prosperity through tax cuts, the average income of the vast majority—the bottom 90 percent of Americans—has increased a meager $303, or 1 percent. Put another way, for each dollar people in the vast majority made in 1980, in 2008 their income was up to $1.01.”

Tax The Rich? 14 Facts You May Want To Consider

“The ultra-rich simply are not going to be taxed into oblivion. They will do whatever it takes to avoid high tax rates.”

“The truth is that our tax system is completely and totally broken.”

“When you crush small businesses you crush job growth in this country.

“If you wanted to truly ‘tax the rich’, you would need to completely throw out our current tax system and come up with something completely and totally different.

And actually, when you get right down to it, an income tax is not even needed to run our country. Until 1913 the United States did just fine without a federal income tax.”

“[T]he solution is to change the rules of the game so that money and financial power does not become so concentrated in the hands of just a few. Our founding fathers intended for all Americans to be able to start businesses and compete. They never intended for gigantic mega-corporations to dominate everything.”

What are your thoughts on taxes?

Git Notes

I have recently taken the plunge into learning Git. These are my notes thus far. I know there are plenty of git write-ups out there on the web. I started this one mostly for myself as a quick cheat sheet. I figure it may be useful to someone so I am sharing it.

My typical git workflow

– git init (or clone)
– work on files on main branch
– git branch [newbranchname] (create a new branch for a new feature)
– git checkout branch (switch to that new branch)
– git merge [newbranchname] (merge new feature into main branch)
– git add . (or git add path/to/file(s))
– git commit (leave good notes)
– git pull [remote] [branch] (to sync with other devs)
– git push [remote] [branch] (send my local commits to other devs or repo server)

Some descriptions of other git commands

git init (initializes a directory as a new Git repository)
git clone [url] (copies an existing Git repository)
git status
git remote (list local "remote" aliases)
git remote add/rm [url] (creates a new alias)
git add (add changes; those could be in files or directory structure)
git add -u (adds unstaged changes including deletes not done with git rm)
git add -p (add changes per chunk in a file!)
gif diff (--cached for staged changes)
git commit (records a snapshot of the staging area)
git commit -m (specify a commit message on the command line)
git commit -a (skip the add step and do it automatically -a will not add new files)
git rm (delete a file, can be used to actually delete the file or after the fact to inform git of the action)
git rm --cached
(aka un-add/un-track)
git reset
(unstage changes that you have staged, opposite of git add)
git checkout --
..." to discard changes in working directory (???)
git update-index --assume-unchanged (ignore uncommitted changes in a file that is already tracked)
git pull/push (eg git push memoryties master)

My main source of information so far has been Git Reference.

Other resources
– http://nvie.com/posts/a-successful-git-branching-model/
– http://progit.org/book/
– git reset: http://progit.org/2011/07/11/reset.html